Try this Advanced Search Hack for the New LinkedIn Desktop

February 13, 2017 / admin  / 
There has been much wailing and gnashing of teeth about the disappearance of advanced search in the new version. I have also been guilty of that, however on the weekend conversations with colleagues forced me to take a fresh look at the free search feature.  

It’s not so much a case that advanced search has been removed from the free desktop version as that it has been replaced. In its place, there is a multi-layered search which always begins in the keyword search box rather in multiple text fields as the original advanced search did.  

Crucially the new desktop version supports Boolean search in key fields. You might have heard people refer to AND, OR, NOT searches, these are some of the most commonly used Boolean phrases.

How Boolean Search works

Using Boolean logic you can construct searches on LinkedIn to look for:
  1. an exact phrase e.g. “Marketing Director”
  2. to exclude a particular term e.g. NOT “Marketing Director”
  3. to include one or more terms in a list e.g. “Marketing Director” OR “Sales Director”
  4. or to get results that include two or more terms in a list e.g. “Marketing Director” AND “Sales Director”
It is also possible to build more complex searches by combining terms in brackets. For example, this search will find people who have Marketing or Director and Division in their profiles. 

“Marketing OR (director AND division)”

Note, that phrases have to be entered in quotes, and the Boolean operator must always be uppercase.

LinkedIn supports Boolean searches in the first name, last name, title, company, and school (college) fields. See LinkedIn’s official help explanation here

Let’s have a look at an example, a search for people with sales or marketing in their titles at computer giant SAP.


LinkedIn Boolean search in new desktop design

Fig 1: LinkedIn Boolean search for sales and marketing people


This is a global search which gives 35,000+ results. I could now refine this with the filters on the right-hand side of the page. 

1. Relationship
2. Locations
3. Current companies
4. Past companies
5. Industries
6. Profile language 
7. Non-profit interests
8. Schools

Now I will try a different search and look for multiple titles, Fig 2.  


Boolean search on LinkedIn

Fig 2: A Boolean search for multiple titles


This search brings up 452 results. I am searching profiles with SAP in the company field, however,  that could be a previous position, so if I now select “SAP” in the current companies filter in right-hand panel that brings my result down to 373.

LinkedIn search filters help to refine search

Fig 3: Using company filter highlights people in current positions at SAP


I could also use any of the other seven filters mentioned above e.g. connections, location etc. to further refine my search.  

Here is one more example of a Boolean expression just to make sure you have understood how to build these. I am looking for people who are in a finance role who work at Ecotricity or Scottish Power but aren’t called Green. 
  
Boolean AND, OR and NOT search on LInkedIn

Fig 4: Example of an OR and NOT search


Pretty powerful stuff eh. I hope you can begin to see now that the advanced search hasn’t so much gone away as morphed into a different type of search. 

There is one temporary problem which you may have noticed. There is no longer an option to save the search, however, I am assured that LinkedIn does plan to restore this in the immediate future. 

Extra Filters on Premium

So now that you have seen what the new search feature can do, and how powerful it is, is there any need to upgrade? Well, the answer is it depends on what you need. The Sales Navigator account has 12 extra filters, these are:
  • Function
  • Years of Experience
  • Company size (employees)
  • Seniority level
  • Postal code (and postal code radius)
  • Groups
  • Years in current position
  • Years at current company
  • Company type (e.g. public v private)
  • Interest in
  • Member since
  • Posted content keywords
If any of these filters are business critical to you then you probably should upgrade. Premium accounts also have access to 15 or more saved searches.

The decision to upgrade is not just about extra filters, it’s also about whether Sales Navigator (or Recruiter Lite) will help you t0 do your job more effectively. If you are thinking of upgrading then you might find this article helpful: “Should I upgrade to LinkedIn Sales Navigator“.  

Conclusion

The new desktop version is evolving, we are all still learning how to get the best from it, including LinkedIn.  I hope this article has been helpful and given you a fresh perspective on LinkedIn’s new desktop search. All is not lost. In fact, very little has been lost, it’s just different. Love to hear your comments below.

Thanks to Mark Williams, Brynne Tillman, and Samantha Bailey who prompted me to look again at LinkedIn’s new desktop search. 

If you enjoyed AND/OR found the article useful please share it so others can too. Thank you. Greg

Ten Things You Can Do This Week to Get New Business from LinkedIn

February 10, 2017 / admin  / 
The secret to finding new business on LinkedIn is simple. Create a credible profile (shop window) then find ways to engage with the sort of people you want to do business with. That’s it, you say? Well, pretty much. Don’t believe me? In that case, I am going to share with you ten practical actions that you can do this week that will help you to get business from LinkedIn.

Now just so you don’t cheat and you get a sense of your own progress I want you to look up your LinkedIn SSI score. This is a score that measures how effectively you are using LinkedIn. I want you to compare your score at the beginning and the end of the week and let me know the difference. 

Get Your Personal LinkedIn Score

To get your LinkedIn score go to this link, scroll down until you come to a yellow button that says “Get your score free”. Click on this and you will see a screen like the one below: 



Fig. 1: Your LinkedIn SSI Score

You will see your personal score out of 100. The score measures things like what percentage of your invitations have been accepted, how often people like and interact with your posts, how well your profile is completed. Don’t worry too much about the details it’s just a useful way of giving you a before and after measure. 

Ten Actions to Do This Week

And so to the actions.

1. Review and refresh your profile.

Your profile is your professional window. It’s a good idea to review your profile at least every three months. Check all sections have been completed fully, including – most important – the summary section. As a minimum, you should aim for an All-Star profile strength. This rating is normally shown on the right-hand side of your profile page, if it is missing (a temporary glitch on the new version) you can also see it on your profile page on the mobile app.

Ask a customer or colleague for feedback on your profile. It’s surprising how easy it is to leave off something that is really important.



Fig 1: Does your LinkedIn photo convey the right impression?







2. Review the keywords on your profile.

Your Linkedin information can be searched from within LinkedIn and externally by search engines like Google, and Bing. Your LinkedIn profile will invariably be the first result that surfaces when people Google you.

LinkedIn’s inbuilt search engine is not as sophisticated as the commercial search engines, it relies heavily on keywords. It is very important therefore that you identify the keywords and phrases that you want to be found for and include these in your profile. In particular, make sure that you use these keywords in the following fields:
  • Headline
  • Summary
  • Experience
  • Skills

    Tip: Rather than cramming in keywords into the main text on the summary and experience fields include a paragraph entitled specialties and stuff them in there, as in this example:
    Specialities
    LinkedIn training; LinkedIn trainer; LinkedIn coach; Social Selling; Profile writing; Profile optimisation; LinkedIn for sales; etc

3.  Follow up people who view your profile.

This is an easy win. If someone has looked at your profile they have expressed an interest in you. This is one of my top sources of new business. I don’t mean that you should follow up everyone, be selective.  I have a premium account so I will use a LinkedIn Inmail to send a short message like this:

“Hi, John, I noticed you dropped by my profile recently. It was probably a casual visit but I just thought I would ask, is there anything I can help you with at the moment”. 

If you have a free account, and the new desktop, LinkedIn have made it much easier to send personalised connection requests.

This week’s action: Monitor people who view your profile every day and follow up selectively. 

4. Actively build your network

Most people on LinkedIn spend more time accepting invitations than sending them.  Think about this for a minute. What it means is you are allowing someone else, often strangers, to shape your network. It’s OK to accept invitations (selectively) but you also need to be actively sending invitations to the people you really want to connect to.  

 Tip: Always send a customised invitation. It’s a better way to start the relationship and is more likely to be accepted.

This week’s action:
Send at least one, ideally two invitations every day.

5. Follow up people who send you invitations

Having accepted an invitation from someone you feel could be relevant now is the time to build on that with a follow-up message. Here is an example:

“Thanks for the invitation. A pleasure to connect. I notice (mention something you have in common). I was wondering was there anything in particular that prompted you to reach out to me?”

Easy peasy. I regularly get business from this.

Tip: To save typing out a message every time, create a templated message in word and tweak it to fit individual circumstances

This week’s action: Follow up everyone whose invitations you accept, even if it is just a simple thank you.

6. Endorse your connections and thank those that endorse you

This one is really easy as LinkedIn regularly prompts us to do this, but do it with integrity only endorse connections for things that you know they know about. 

Take the opportunity to say thank you and add a little personal message when someone endorses you.

This week’s action: Be generous with your endorsements and say thanks when you are endorsed.

7. Post one update every day

Updates are the lifeblood of LinkedIn and one of the best ways of staying front of mind with your network. Here are some ideas of things you might post about:

  • Organisation news
  • Achievements or awards
  • Industry news, research, and reports
  • Product launch or review
  • Topical stories
  • Request feedback, advice or opinions
  • Tips and how to guides
  • Examples of excellent practice
  • Case studies

    Tip: It doesn’t always have to be original content, as long as you are sharing something that is relevant to your audience

This week’s action: Post one (at least) update every day

8. Write an article

If you feel comfortable with writing, then publishing an article on Linkedin is one of the best ways to position yourself as an expert on Linkedin. If you are new to writing on LinkedIn you might find this article useful: Be Known for What You Know.

As a guide, I find it usually takes me about 2 hours to write an article; most articles are 500-1,000 words.

This week’s action: If you are comfortable with writing, publish one article.

9. Reactivate existing contacts

I guarantee that sitting in your LinkedIn network are some great opportunities that you have overlooked. One of the quickest ways of spotting these is simply to export your connections to an excel file and visually scan through them. Your brain will make the links and spot the opportunities. 

Here is a link to the export your contacts option. 

This week’s action: Export your contacts, review and re-engage with selected contacts.

10. Be Active in Groups

You can join up to 100 groups but it would be impossible to be active in all but a few. I suggest choose two or three where you know that your target audience is to be found in some numbers and stick with these. Regularly join in conversations. Consistency is more important than frequency. This is a great way to raise your profile in your chosen niche or location.

This week’s action: Join in at least two group conversations

Summary of Actions

I appreciate you are busy and I am asking you to fit something else into an already busy week, that’s why I have deliberately set some modest targets. With the exception of writing an article, if you choose to do that, everything else will take just a few minutes a day. 

Remember to get your LinkedIn SSI Score first so we have a before and after comparison, and I am also expecting to hear some concrete examples of new business won and opportunities uncovered.

Here is a summary of the week’s actions:

1.   Review and refresh your profile
2.   Review the keywords on your profile
3.   Monitor people who view your profile every day and follow up selectively
4.   Send at least one, ideally two invitations every day
5.   Follow up everyone whose invitations you accept, even if it is just a simple thank you
6.   Be generous with your endorsements and say thanks when you are endorsed
7.   Post one update every day
8.   If you are comfortable with writing, publish one article
9.   Export your contacts, review and re-engage withs elected contacts
10. Join in at least two group conversations

And finally, update your LinkedIn SSI Score and share this in the comments below, along with news of business opportunities that you have uncovered. 

Thanks for participating. If you enjoyed this article and found it useful please like and share it.